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7 Health Facts About Irish Children

7 Health Facts About Irish Children

Media credit: http://irishhealing.ie/healing/tag/children/
Media credit: http://irishhealing.ie/healing/tag/children/

In the spirit of St. Patrick’s Day, March 17th, let’s look at the health of Irish children. Here are 7 key findings from a study conducted by the National Children’s Food Survey (NCFS) from a sample of 594 Irish children (293 boys and 301 girls) aged 5 to 12 years during 2003 and 2004.

  • More than 1 in 5 (22%) of children aged 5-12 years were carrying excess body weight (2 x increase in the number of overweight and obese children in 15 years)
  • Children live in homes where 3 in 5 Irish adults are overweight or obese (66% of men and 54% of women)
  • 90% of a child’s food intake came from the home
  • Overweight parents were associated with a greater risk for overweight children
  • Overweight and obesity affected all social classes and levels of education
  • Overweight children on average watched 30 more minutes of television compared to children with healthy weights
  • More than 4 in 5 parents (85%) who had children who were overweight and more than 1 in 2 parents (56%) who had children who were obese believed their child’s weight was fine for their age.

The study gave multiple recommendations, but here are two recommendations can apply to any country:

  • Priority must be given to supporting parents and guardians in the home environment. One way is through public awareness campaigns. Additionally, schools can hold wellness nights where education on diet, exercise, and television watching can be discussed. Moreover, parents need to make conscious efforts to be active and eat healthy with their children.
  • Parents should know the national physical activity guidelines. The Irish National Physical Activity Guidelines recommend at least 60 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity every day for children and at least 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity on 5 days a week or 150 minutes a week for adults. The guidelines for the US are the same and can be found here: http://health.gov/paguidelines/guidelines/

It appears the Irish have similar problems with obesity and overweight as most of the rest of the world.

obesity-rates national

On a positive note, according to a more recent study published in October 2014 in BMC Public Health, the prevalence rates of childhood obesity in Ireland have levelled off.  (see: here)

As parents, it is impossible to be perfect. I’m very guilty of this as my three-year-old wants nothing but pancakes with a lot of whip cream on it! I think what matters is that we are aware of the recommendations to keep our children healthy and that we take the baby steps to get there. My daughter had grapes with her whip cream pancakes. Baby steps!

Here is a fun physical activity I tried. I took my younger two children on a bike ride to several parks. We stopped at each one, and they ran around like crazy. It was a great exercise for all of us.

Bike ride with my little ones
Bike ride with my little ones

Do you have any other recommendations for any baby steps you took to try and keep your children healthy and active? Or do you have any other interesting Irish children health facts?

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Media credit: http://countdown.onlineclock.net/countdowns/stpatricksday/happy-st-patricks-day.jpg
Media credit: http://countdown.onlineclock.net/countdowns/stpatricksday/happy-st-patricks-day.jpg

 

 

Reference: Safefood and Health Service Executive (2011) Body weight and eating habits in 5-12 year old Irish children. Retrieved from http://www.safefood.eu/SafeFood/media/SafeFoodLibrary/Documents/Publications/Research%20Reports/Bodyweight-pdf.pdf

 

Ipuna Black

Ipuna Black

I’m the mother of four children and have worked in the area of pediatrics as a nurse since 2001. A few initials I have accumulated include: PhD in Nursing, MSN in Nursing, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, and RN. My seven-year-old son was hospitalized in 2015 for almost two months with encephalitis and Guillain Barré syndrome. This gave me a deeper perspective on health and wellness for children, and Healthy Kids Play was born. Healthy Kids Play is a child health and wellness blog sharing resources and information to help parents make informed decisions to keep our children healthy and playing. My mission is to help parents, caretakers, educators, and researchers raise healthy kids by sharing resources and information on the multiple influences on child health (physical, intellectual, emotional, social, spiritual, and environmental). I hope to inspire others to keep our children playing. After all, they are our next generation.

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